5 not-to-miss articles from October

Every month we present 5 articles that caught our attention for their relevance, originality and/or depth of insight. Stress and micromanagement, collective intelligence, machine learning... Here is our selection for October. Happy reading!

Human Resources

“Quand l’intelligence collective dessine le future des ressources humaines” by Frank Escoubès (Usbek & Rica)

Co-founder of technology development and consulting firm Bluenove Frank Escoubès outlines the future of HR, which, according to him, has everything to gain by leveraging collective intelligence.

 

Innovation

“Pourquoi les start-up françaises n’ont pas la culture du brevet” by Judith Chetrit (Usbek & Rica)

This article looks at patent filing among French startups. Laborious, expensive filing procedures make French startups less likely to file patents, and some organizations want to change this by providing stronger administrative and financial support to help them protect their ideas.

 

Followership

“How to become a powerful follower… and a good leader” by Augusto Giacoman (Strategy + Business)

Read this article about how becoming a skillful follower can bring you closer to achieving the highest level of leadership, as well as the concrete steps you can take to become a more effective follower.

 

Machine learning

“How to Spot a Machine Learning Opportunity, Even if You Aren’t a Data Scientist” by Kathryn Hume (Harvard Business Review)

“Having an intuition for how machine learning algorithms work – even in the most general sense – is becoming an important business skill. Machine learning scientists can’t work in a vacuum; business stakeholders should help them identify problems worth solving,” Kathryn Hume writes before going on to provide you with tips on how to get started honing this skill for yourself.

 

Personal development

“Stress is making you micromanage, which is making everything worse” by Caterina Kostoula (Fast Company)

Tightening your grip when you feel you don’t have a strong handle on things is a common response to stress – but it’s a response that’s only likely to aggravate your own stress, not to mention the stress of your teams! Here are four questions to ask yourself about stress-induced micromanagement and suggestions for healthier coping strategies.