Culture change, personalized team management and AI… These topics and more are covered in our selection of this month’s 5-not-to-miss articles!

Here are five articles that stood out this month for their originality, relevance, and/or analysis. Happy reading!

 

Organization
“Getting to the critical few behaviors that can drive cultural change”
(Strategy+Business)

Culture change can feel like a insurmountable challenge, partly because what determines culture — how and what the people within an organization do on a daily basis — can feel slippery and hard to pin down. Hence the value of this refreshingly precise and concrete four-step process to culture change, based on the
idea that focusing on a few critical behaviors has the potential for real impact.

Marketing, sales & retail
“How online shopping makes suckers of us all”
(The Atlantic)

In online retail, standard prices and simple discounts are giving way to complex marketing strategies designed — with insights gleaned from data analytics — to extract the maximum amount of money possible from consumers.

Team management
“Do you know how each person on your team likes to work?”
(Harvard Business Review)

Insight into your own personal work style and the working styles of your team members increases your chances of leading successful collaboration. This article outlines a concrete exercise designed to develop your understanding of the team’s individual working preferences and the areas where slight adaptations could help the team run more smoothly.

Personal development
“Got a Micromanager Boss? Take These Four Steps”
(Fast Company)

How can you thrive under a boss that constantly undermines you by interfering with your work? This article presents four tips for coping with a micromanager boss, including Tip 1 to intentionally build up your confidence in the face of their lack of confidence and Tip 3 «Think of your boss like your customer. »

Digital & Tech
“Intelligence artificielle: un logiciel abat en 1s le travail que des avocats font en 360.000 heures”
(Paper Geek)

At JPMorgan Chase & Co, a learning machine is their new top employee! The software program, called COIN, can do in seconds work – more specifically, tedious work interpreting commercial-loan agreements – that used to take 360,000 man hours for per year for the firm’s lawyers and loan officers.