What will work look like in the future?

Our selection:
From business networks to telecommuting and gamification, the work of tomorrow looks very different from what it did over the past 50 years, says Sandra Enlart and Olivier Charbonnier, founders of DSides, an innovation and foresight laboratory. What will work look like in the future? They explain how, in light of technological developments, working methods will not only evolve, but so will our relationships to companies, management, and more. Some results may be disappointing. For example, past experience reveals that gamification might not be the ultimate solution to employee engagement. When Google Switzerland decided to make the work environment fun, many employees protested. No, taking a slide to go to lunch is not necessarily pleasant. No, a meeting in a phone booth is not always exciting. “Sometimes we don’t want to believe work is fun because it’s simply not always the case.”

Why did we choose this book
This book presents a clearsighted view not only of the changes expected to take place in working tools and practices but also of the potential consequences of those changes for how we approach daily tasks, management, and interactions with others. Going off the beaten track, it avoids simplistic dreams of a future in which work is inherently more fantastistic than today, a future in which everyone works from their sofas and all tasks become like play.

Read our dossier
Gamification: Should work be like play?

Based on “Le management saisi par les jeux” by Kevin Werbach, Rajat Paharia and Daniel Debow, December 2011 , “Gamification is here to stay” by Gabe Zichermann, April 2011 and other sources.
Business Digest nº 223, february 2012

Read our dossier
Why Some Companies Succeed at Telecommuting … And Not Others

Based on “Companies Pay the Price for Inflexibility” by Rebecca Knight, The Financial Times Blogs; et “Flex and the C-Suite” by Cali Williams Yost, and the interview with Caroline Jessen, DRH, Cisco France.
Business Digest nº 218, july 2011